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Friday, 4 January 2019

David Chipperfield unveils sister towers in London's Hackney built from grey and red bricks

Hoxton Press by David Chipperfield Architects and Karakusevic Carson Architects
David Chipperfield Architects has teamed up with Karakusevic Carson Architects to create a pair of matching, hexagonal housing towers with on an estate in east London.

Hoxton Press is a pair of two residential towers on the Colville Estate in Hackney. One is 16 storeys high and built using red brick, while the other is 20 storeys and constructed from a darker grey brick.
Hoxton Press by David Chipperfield Architects and Karakusevic Carson Architects
Photo is by Simon Menges
The projects forms part of Karakusevic Carson's redevelopment of the entire Colville Estate – a three-phase project that will see the 1950s-built, 438-home council estate replaced with 925 new residences, along with improved community facilities and public spaces.

Both towers are hexagonal in plan, with balconies wrapping their corners. They are orientated to minimise the impact on the surroundings.
Hoxton Press by David Chipperfield Architects and Karakusevic Carson Architects
Photo is by Simon Menges
"At 16 and 20 storeys, they are not the most elegant of profiles, but by faceting them you get slimmer proportions," explained Paul Karakusevic, director of Karakusevic Carson, during a tour of the building.
"There's this idea that, on the ground floor, there is no real back to the building, there's no dark area; it's very open," added Alexander Hill of David Chipperfield Architects.
"Upstairs as well, the plans are actually very simple, these kind of concentric bands," he told Dezeen.
Hoxton Press by David Chipperfield Architects and Karakusevic Carson Architects
Photo is by Ioana Marinescu
The hexagonal plan creates a simple layout, with six homes arranged around a central core on each floor of the building, plus penthouses at the top. Homes are organised at alternate corners of the building, allowing the generously sized balconies to function as extensions of the living spaces.
"Many tall housing schemes have these kind of barcode plans, where the developer asks to move walls back and forward. But we have a really strong plan – that is something we were really interested in, creating something that is really coherent," said Hill.
"Every apartment has this amazing corner view."
Hoxton Press by David Chipperfield Architects and Karakusevic Carson Architects
Photo is by Simon Menges
The two types of brick chosen for the towers both come from Belgian brick company Vande Moortel. They are made from the same clay, however the grey bricks were fired twice rather than once.
The aim was to give the towers distinct identities, but to also create an affinity with the history of the estate and the other new buildings on it.
"These are handmade water-struck Belgian bricks. They have smooth, stone-like quality," said Hill. "With the colour-match mortar you get this quite sculptural appearance."
"The building feels quite solid," he added.
Hoxton Press by David Chipperfield Architects and Karakusevic Carson Architects
Photo is by Simon Menges
Hoxton Press contains a total of 198 homes, which are being sold privately to help fund the cost of new affordable homes elsewhere on the estate.
The design contract was awarded to the two London-based architecture studios following an open competition. Having already designed the first two phases of the design, as well as the masterplan, Karakusevic Carson enlisted David Chipperfield's studio to ensure they won the contest for phase three.
The project was awarded planning permission in 2014.
Hoxton Press by David Chipperfield Architects and Karakusevic Carson Architects
Photo is by Peter Landers
As well as residences, the taller of the two buildings contains a large space that will be used as a community cafe.
"The residents have been really supportive of the idea of building here, to pay for all of the new housing to be built, so obviously a sort of hipster cafe would not be great for the wider neighbourhood," said Karakusevic.
"If they're selling £4 cups of coffee, while people living behind can barely afford the electricity bill, its not a good feel."

The cafe space features vaulted ceilings, as well as a large glazed frontage. This facade lifts in one corner, where the paving rises up to create a hump in the landscape – forming an informal meeting point.
The smaller tower contains the entrance to an underground car park that serves both buildings, and also includes storage for bicycles.
Hoxton Press by David Chipperfield Architects and Karakusevic Carson Architects
Photo is by Peter Landers
The project is David Chipperfield Architects' first high-rise housing project in the UK, where the studio has recently completed an extension of the Royal Academy of Arts and created a new entrance to department store Selfridges.
The studio's other housing projects include a "village" of stone dwellings in Hangzhou, China, and The Bryant tower in New York.

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