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Friday, 29 November 2019

Angular roof tops concrete garden annex for São Paulo home

PK Residence Annex by Reinach Mendonça Architects


Brazilian firm Reinach Mendonça Architects Associados has added a geometric concrete pavilion to a family home in São Paulo, offering a place for reading and entertaining.
PK Residence Annex is built on the property of a residence in the Brazilian city, which is complete with a separate concrete volume attached to a garage for barbequing.
PK Residence Annex by Reinach Mendonça Architects
"The family decided to acquire the neighbouring land to expand their garden, build leisure spaces, live together and house part of their collections of works of art," said Reinach Mendonça Arquitetos Associados (RMAA).
PK Residence Annex by Reinach Mendonça Architects
The detached concrete volume is designed without any right angles to add to the geometric form. Its shape is defined by a slanted roof topped with grass, that joins a wall that encloses a small courtyard.
"This sloping roof volume turns to the back of the lot with its highest facade and forwards with its lower face, exposing its green roof to the street," said the local studio.
PK Residence Annex by Reinach Mendonça Architects
RMAA chose the angular design to contrast with the main residence, which is connected by a covered walkway.
"The aim was to make clear the differences both in time and in the function of the new spaces," the studio said. "We sought to impress the feeling of being elsewhere, to practice other activities, even being part of the existing residence."
PK Residence Annex by Reinach Mendonça Architects
The exterior barrier connects to the sloped roofline of the annex by a slender concrete beam, to create a small courtyard. Nestled in between the barrier and the unit is a black sculpture by the late Brazilian artist Maria Martins.
PK Residence Annex by Reinach Mendonça Architects
"The sculpture had its implantation studied so that it could be seen from different angles and lighting further enhances the scene created there," the studio said.
Greenery drips over the entrance of the 145-square-metre structure, which is defined by a bold red wall.
The interiors comprise exposed concrete walls and concrete slab floors that extend to an outside area. This space is covered by the roof as it extends out to rest on black pillars.
PK Residence Annex by Reinach Mendonça Architects
Inside, PK Residence Annex has an open-plan living area for the family to watching movies or entertain guests. A white sofa and wood rocking chairs furnish the space.
The room also includes wooden bookshelves and a desk to study, work and read under a round skylight. There is also a bathroom and a wine cellar.
PK Residence Annex by Reinach Mendonça Architects
Based in São Paulo, Reinach Mendonça Arquitetos Associados was started in 1987 by architects Henrique Reinach and Mauricio Mendonça. The studio has also built a two-storey linear concrete house in Brazil, divided into a "night floor" and "daytime floor".
Photography is by Nelson Kon.

Takt Studio shades its workspace with corrugated plastic shutters

The Drawing Room by Takt Studio


Moving shutters of corrugated plastic shade this drawing studio pavilion in the Illawarra Escarpment, Australia, designed by Takt Studio as an extension to its workspaces.
Located on a slope and abutting a large retaining wall, The Drawing Room has a long, thin footprint of 1.8 metres by 6.4 metres.
The Drawing Room by Takt Studio
It provides a meeting and work space for Takt Studio, along with a coffee kitchen and a storage space.
A path of decking hugs the contour of the slope, and leads to a series of steps up the hillside that connect to the studio's other buildings.
The Drawing Room by Takt Studio
"The project was developed as part of a townscape rather than an extension to another building," said the studio.
"This tiny build explores the possibility of fine-grained, highly functional interventions on a site between the suburbs and the bush, where living and working are closely interwoven."
The Drawing Room by Takt Studio
In order to maximise the connection with the garden space in front of the structure, the facade's windows have been given deep frames that double as seating areas above a thin strip of decking.
Due to the temperate climate of the area, the translucent shutters that can be lowered to cover these windows are often left open, bringing natural light and air into the workspace.
The Drawing Room by Takt Studio
"The drawing room exists and an open verandah, an edge to the garden, with veiled views across the ocean or at night to the lights of the city below," said the practice.
At the rear of the space, clerestory windows placed above the retaining wall filter further light down into the spaces, which are framed by the structural ribs of recycled dark hardwood.
The Drawing Room by Takt Studio
The mono-pitched roof space, which sits at the level of the road above, has been used to create an easily-accessible storage area.
A sloping roof lined with corrugated metal minimises the roof's impact on the ability of sunlight to reach the garden below.
The Drawing Room by Takt Studio
Blackboard walls cover the front and rear elevations, intended to create and area where local friends and children can personalise the studio with their own artwork.
Fibre-reinforced cement panels have been used for the rest of the cladding, as well as for flooring and lining, in what the studio call "an exploration of simplicity."
The Drawing Room by Takt Studio
"The space remains spare, and ready to be filled with project discourse, reading, lunching, drawing and imagining," said the studio.
Takt Studio was founded in New South Wales by Brent Dunn and Katharina Hendel. The practice recently made similar use of simple, industrial materials to encase a 1950s brick bungalow, also in Illawarra.
In the UK, Invisible Studio also used corrugated plastic to create a prototyping workshop in the middle of the woods.
Photography is by Takt Studio.