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Friday, 15 November 2019

ASWA wraps own architecture studio around internal courtyard

Self-designed ASWA Studio by ASWA


ASWA Studio has designed as its architecture studio in Bangkok around a fully glazed internal courtyard that brings daylight into the building.
Thai studio ASWA built its office, which contains working spaces for up to eight staff members, a meeting area and a model-display zone, on a 100-square-metre plot that was previously used for car parking.
Self-designed ASWA Studio by ASWA
The office is built around a six-square-metre courtyard, which is surrounded by glass walls. Workspaces and a model making space are wrapped around the courtyard, which has been inhabited by birds, squirrels and frogs.
"The natural light contributes beautiful shade and a great view for the studio," explained Phuttipan Aswakool, co-founder of ASWA.
Self-designed ASWA Studio by ASWA
The exterior of the studio is clad with dark green corrugated metal sheets. Each of the external facades has no more than two openings to limit views out and creates a contrast with the fully glazed walls facing into the courtyard.
The character of the studio was the reasoning behind the mostly internal views, explains Aswakool.
"Personally, we are a bit introvert," he told Dezeen. "We love to concentrate in our own space and don't like to expose everything to everyone."
Self-designed ASWA Studio by ASWA
The asymmetric hip roof, which is also clad with corrugated metal, has been designed so that it is highest above the office space where the team works.
The roof has a steep slope to help the functionality of a rainwater drainage system, which collects  natural water that is fed into the courtyard.
Self-designed ASWA Studio by ASWA
Inside the office the working areas are located in the area with high ceilings underneath the roof's point.
Storage and shelving displays for models are located where the ceiling height is lower as team members frequent this space less.
Self-designed ASWA Studio by ASWA
Black window frames and chairs highlight the all-white interior, designed by the studio as a blank canvas for their activities and work.
ASWA, which stands for Architectural Studio of Work Aholic, was founded in 2013 by Aswakool and Chotiros Techamongklapiwat. The duo explained to Dezeen their previous office space was a small apartment room, which their growing team eventually outgrew.
In Chicago, Moss has also self-designed a studio, which is also organised around a central courtyard.

Kooo Architects inserts plywood-lined hotel rooms into an existing concrete frame

Hotel Far&Near XinYuqingli St by Kooo Architects in China


Plywood panels and fabric curtains have been used by by Kooo Architects to transform an existing concrete structure into a guesthouse in Guangzhou, China.
The exterior has been clad with clad with grey and black bricks, which were reclaimed from the building that originally stood on the site.
Hotel Far&Near XinYuqingli St by Kooo Architects in China
High parapets incorporate screens of perforated brickwork, referencing similar features found in the surrounding architecture.
The guesthouse is the second guesthouse Tokyo-based Kooo Architects has completed in the city for hotel chain Far & Near.
The first, a hotel on Nanaho St, involved a similarly light-touch retrofit of a rough concrete structure.
Hotel Far&Near XinYuqingli St by Kooo Architects in China
Four storeys in height, the interior of the existing structure was stripped back and reconfigured to provide 11 guest rooms.
There is also a common area for guests, which can be isolated from the adjacent corridor by drawing a large curtain.
Hotel Far&Near XinYuqingli St by Kooo Architects in China
Rather than conceal any of the existing structure, the rooms are framed by the large concrete beams and columns.
This concrete has also been left exposed on the floor in the entrance hallways, stairs and some small areas of the ceiling.
Hotel Far&Near XinYuqingli St by Kooo Architects in China
"Aiming to preserve the beauty of these existing concrete structures, we chose to expose them as part of the interior design," said the studio.
"We designed this way both to preserve the nature and the particular aesthetic of the original architecture, at the same time satisfying the low budget."
Hotel Far&Near XinYuqingli St by Kooo Architects in China
Meranti plywood panels have been used to create a datum lining the common areas.
In the bedrooms, a paler basswood ply has been used to cover walls, floors and ceilings, as well as creating built-in shelves and benches.
Hotel Far&Near XinYuqingli St by Kooo Architects in China
Slight alterations to the position and size of openings on the elevations were made to allow more light into the new rooms and improve the facade's visual proportions.
While some rooms have only small openings looking out to the street, others have full-height glazed walls.
Hotel Far&Near XinYuqingli St by Kooo Architects in China
Window frames are concealed behind the floors to appear invisible from the interior and increase the feeling of openness.
On the upper floor and in the stairwell long, narrow skylights cut through the concrete floor-plates draw light down into the interiors.
Hotel Far&Near XinYuqingli St by Kooo Architects in China
Kooo Architects, which has offices in Tokyo and Shanghai, was founded by Shinya Kojima and Ayaka Kojima. As well as the Nanaho St. Hotel, previous projects include a latticed-timber café in Hangzhou.
Photography is by Keishin Horikoshi.